Home Health ‘Anti-ageing’ hormone could unlock new treatments for kidney and heart disease

‘Anti-ageing’ hormone could unlock new treatments for kidney and heart disease

13 February 2017
‘Anti-ageing’ hormone could unlock new treatments for kidney and heart disease

Research by scientists at King’s College London has found that patients with diabetes suffering from the early stages of kidney disease have a deficiency of the protective ‘anti-ageing’ hormone, Klotho.

For the first time, Klotho has been linked to kidney disease in type 1 diabetes patients and this finding represents an exciting step towards developing new markers for disease and potentially new treatments.

Dr Giuseppe Maltese, Cardiovascular Division

This means that Klotho may play a significant role in the development of kidney disease, which is often prevalent in patients with diabetes. It could also mean that Klotho levels have the potential to be used as a risk marker to predict kidney disease, as well as being a target for developing new treatments to prevent kidney disease in patients with type 1 diabetes.

Previous work undertaken at King’s has also shown that Klotho protects the vascular system against changes associated with abnormal ageing, such as the thickening of artery walls (atherosclerosis), which characterises age related disorders such as diabetes, heart disease and hypertension.

In the new study, researchers found that diabetes patients with signs of the earliest stages of kidney disease had lower levels of the circulating Klotho hormone, compared with patients without kidney disease. Klotho levels in patients without kidney disease were similar to levels found in healthy adults.

First author of the study, Dr Giuseppe Maltese, from the Cardiovascular Division at King’s College London said: ‘For the first time, Klotho has been linked to kidney disease in type 1 diabetes patients and this finding represents an exciting step towards developing new markers for disease and potentially new treatments.’

Senior author, Dr Janaka Karalliedde, said: ‘With further research using larger cohorts of patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes we hope to expand the scope of this work to identify at an early stage patients at high risk of progression of kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.’

Dr Richard Siow, a co-author of the study, recently published research which showed the protective effects of Klotho in cardiovascular cells and said: ‘This study highlights the important clinical and basic science research that is being undertaken on Klotho at King’s.

‘Our research will help scientists to better understand the mechanisms by which this hormone benefits healthy ageing, as well as how deficits in Klotho lead to age related diseases. We are conducting further research on the role of Klotho in ageing and longevity as part of ARK (Ageing Research at King’s) research initiatives.’

The study is published in the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, Diabetologia.

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